Year: 2012

Winter Trail Running in Colorado

Winter Trail Running is one of my favorite training routines. I love the cold air. I love the snow underfoot. It’s much softer than running on pavement. This morning it was 2 degrees F in Keystone Colorado. I had some other things to do, or I would have run first thing in the morning.

My 12 year old son wasn’t up for Winter Trail Running, but decided to go snowshoeing instead. I gave him a little head start. After a while I started up the road behind Keystone Resort in Colorado. The Ski Patrol uses this road to haul injured skiers down to meet the ambulance. Sure enough at the gate to the road an ambulance waited. About a quarter mile up the road I stepped to the side to allow the snowmobile to pass. There was an injured skier in the sled, with red and blue lights flashing.

For Winter Trail Running you have to experiment a lot with clothing and shoes. I try to dress as lightly as possible. This afternoon it’s about 15 degrees, but the sun will be going behind the ridge soon and the temperature will drop. I’ll also spend some time walking with my son. My plan is to run and walk in intervals. The Polar Graph shows my intervals best in the heart rate zone lines.

For my Winter Trail Running, actually any trail running, I like to wear my Polar RS800CX GPS G5 Heart Rate Monitor. I like the graphing functions in Polar ProTrainer, and export the data to Google Earth so I can see it from a very different angle. Using the Polar WebLink software I can upload my data to PolarPersonalTrainer.com but that’s very clunky. I only do that to add my Training Load data. That way I can plan my intensity of training for the next few days to ensure proper recovery.

Winter Trail Running Clothing

Today for winter trail running I wore a thin long sleeve training tee as a baselayer. Over that I wore a thin zipper hoodie. For my outer layer I wore a windproof winter training jacket. I wore a thin beanie from TNF, and in the shadow of the setting sun, I flipped the hood up. For gloves I wore a pair of REI winter cycling gloves with the lobster configuration, since my hands were a bit cold last year in my fleece gloves.

My lower body winter trail running choice was a single layer loose winter tight by Sporthill. I’ve never worn it before so it was a bit risky. It felt just a little warm in the sun, and just perfect in the shadows. On my feet I wore a pair of Injinji liners under a pair of Smartwool PHD thick mountaineering socks. They fit just perfect in the Salomon Men’s Spikecross 3 CS Winter Trail Running Shoes. I wore these on my hike up Quandary last winter. They have sharp square rubber lugs on the sole and steel spikes that stick in the ice. Tip: don’t put them on and walk on your tile or carpet if you can help it. They’re also noisy on asphalt.

Everything worked fine. I did sweat a little bit, and it got chilled a lot during those times I walked with my son. As soon as I started moving I warmed up again quickly, so I think it was a good balance. The shoes worked good, and my feet were never cold. These are very thick socks though. One thing I noticed is that these shoes do have a bit of a heel, and it’s very stiff. If you’re used to flatter, or more cushioned shoes it will take a bit of effort to stay forward on your toes. Especially on the downhills.

Weighted Backpack Training – 60 lb pack

Weighted backpack training is almost essential for mountaineering success. Most types of climbing and hiking adventures require you to carry a backpack. If you train with a heavy backpack previous to your trip, you will most likely do better.

weighted backpack training is a necessity for alaskan mountaineering
Glacier travel in Alaska with 85 lb pack. It’s much easier if you train hard for it first.

I went in and put my bags through the x-ray, forgetting my passport in my bag, causing the poor door guards minor consternation, since I had to go past the gate to collect my passport, but could not pass the gate without one. We got it sorted out, and I went to the check in desk. My completely full backpack was only 14 kg. — Elbrus, My Waterloo (Seven Summits Quest)

Some mountaineers will have a few different backpacks for different conditions. Having one just for weighted backpack training probably won’t work for everyone. If you use the one you will be using for your trip, you will have a chance to work out any bugs or fitting issues. Begin with an empty backpack, with just an old pillow stuck in to keep it stable in use.

Hiking and Weighted Backpack Training – New Book “Rucking Simple Treadmill Training Guide” CLICK HERE

weighted backpack training begins with an empty pack
Start your workouts with a light pack and work your way higher and higher in weights

Over time you can add more and more weight as you improve endurance and strength. For my weighted backpack training I use bags of rice, since we usually have a few in the pantry. I double bag them in the disposable thin plastic shopping bags in case the paper rips. The rice is very close to the same density and feel as other backpacking gear. Slide it in near your back, and stuff another pillow between the rice (or beans, wheat, etc.) and the outside of the backpack. This will keep it from moving around while in motion.

Weighted Backpack Training helps you maneuver a heavy backpack
Be strong enough to hold your 45 lb pack off balance

When you get past 40 pounds or so, you’ll probably want to use something with more density. Unless you get a lot of rice or beans or get the 50 pound sacks if you can. Some people use gallon jugs of water. If you do a lot of weight training and have them handy and available, you can use weights. Steel plates, kettle bells, dumbbells, are all excellent additions to your weighted backpack training loads. Pad them well with pillows since they will have more inertia when you jostle in training. Just be very careful when setting the bag down. Dropping a ten pound bag of rice on your toe is very different from dropping a ten pound kettle bell on your toe.

Exclusive Offer: Hiking and Weighted Backpack Training PROGRAM HERE

weighted backpack training on a jacobs ladder machine can be risky
Be very careful if training on a cardio machine that requires you to lean in odd angles

If you have access to cardio machines, and it’s okay to use them for weighted backpack training, start slowly and be careful. Some machines, like the Jacob’s Ladder, can put your back at a dangerous angle. You might not be able to use as much weight on it. I like the Incline Treadmill the best, and just go steady and slow. I love the elliptical machines too, as it reduces greatly the impact you’ll feel while still providing a great leg workout. Set the resistance up high and go slow. This is more realistic for steep hiking. Stairmasters work good, and again, go slow. Also be sure you know how much you and the pack weighs so you can set it correctly. Most gyms have a scale that should go up to your weight plus the backpack.

New Article: Weighted Backpack Training On Stairs

Weighted Backpack Training Outside

Some people can just toss 24 pounds of rice in a backpack and walk 3 or 4 miles every day in their neighborhood. That’s probably good enough for most people and adventures, and it’s a great scenic workout. Some people can do a lot of hill climbing, or better yet, steep mountain trail ascents. If that’s the case consider using gallon jugs of water for weight. At the top you can dump the water on a handy needy shrub. This lightens the load to protect your knees on the downhill.

Weighted backpack training can make hikes like Half Dome seem mild
Carry a daypack on a long hike

Weighted Backpack Training – What’s in the 60 lb pack?

Weighted Backpack Training Warnings

  • Don’t try so much to improve your speed and resistance. That’s nice and all, but your first priority in weighted backpack training is to increase the weight of the backpack. You can train up to a weight much higher than your anticipated on-mountain weight. This will make all your climbing feel a lot easier in general.
  • Be very careful and go slow. Putting on a heavy backpack can be difficult and a strain on back muscles that can cause damage or worse. If you start with a light pack and work your way up, you should be strong enough for each increase.
  • If you try to put your backpack on and just can’t do it, maybe that’s not the session for weighted backpack training. Relax and do something else.
  • Weighted backpack training is good for your core, but don’t try too hard. It’s potentially a lot of weight in a strange place at strange angles. Avoid hanging on for your life. If you have to, it means you have the machine set too fast.
  • In fact, mix it up. Do different machines, at different angles, at different speeds. Most hiking trails are a combination of things anyway. Try to avoid downhill under heavy load, just for knee and back safety.
  • I wear a tech tee under a cotton tee to provide resistance to the abrasion of the straps.

Good luck, and train safe. Only do what you are capable of safely.

Bodyweight Exercise One Legged Band Sissy Squat

I like to do some type of bodyweight exercise for warming up. It’s also great for working the smaller stabilizing muscles that I think shouldn’t be trained under heavy load. Unilateral bodyweight exercise is particularly good for the stabilizers and core.

bodyweight exercise is one tool in quad development
Quad definition is a combination of nutrition and training

In this example, the one legged band sissy squat, it takes a lot of effort to stay level. It’s definitely not for beginners. You should get in a few hundred reps on the two leg version of this bodyweight exercise before trying the single leg version. Try it with your feet and knees together to work your way into it. This simulates the balance of doing it with one leg.

If you’ve done the band version of the sissy squat all you need to do to convert it to the single leg bodyweight exercise is to lift one leg and place the ankle over your knee. Lower slowly the first time or two and don’t try the full range of motion until you get a feel for it. It’s quite different.

Bodyweight Exercise Video for One Legged Band Sissy Squat

The blue band I am using is the Jumpstretch Strong Band #6 but similar products from EliteFTS will work as well.

Setting up the bodyweight exercise for legs

I’m looping mine over the pullup bar on my power rack. You can use just about anything that will hold your body weight and is a little over head high. Like the top of a door. Think simple. You could loop a piece of webbing with a knot in it and slam it in a solid door. Be careful though to make it strong enough. This is a bodyweight exercise. Test your system with full body weight before you drop backward into the squat.

If you feel any level of pain or major instability stop immediately. You might have to work your way into this gently with something like one legged chair sitting or partial squats with one leg. I’m including the video for this easier bodyweight exercise below:

Concept2 SkiErg Upper Body Warmup Series

I have been using the Concept2 SkiErg for a while now for cross training primarily. I also like it as a warmup for upper body training. The resistance is a large fan, similar to the Concept2 rowing machines, only upright. Inside the post are ropes exiting the top at two rotating swiveling pulleys. There are 10 resistance settings, depending on your training goals and personal fitness level.

Concept2 SkiErg upper body training
Getting my back and Lats ready for Ice Climbing

For my upper body warmup, I set the Concept2 SkiErg (Ski Ergometer – the movement simulates the arm/hand motion of Nordic skiing) to level 5, about halfway on the resistance scale. I mix it up a bit, but in general do a little Lat work and a little Pec work. I do some Core work and occasionally a little Tricep work.

For a more advanced warmup, especially if I’m doing a few extra minutes of core work, I keep a wobble disc [Reebok Balance Board] or pad handy to add some instability. I like how it helps me use my core and leg stabilizers. It’s also a pretty cool mind game, since it’s tough doing a few different things at once.

Concept2 SkiErg Warmup Video

Concept2 SkiErg Warmup Ideas

Some things to keep in mind when using the Concept2 SkiErg for training other than as intended. The pulleys will go a lot of different directions. Experiment and see what different angles you can come up with. Keep in mind that the rope is thin, and limited in length. Don’t try too hard to go past the internal stop. Protect your back, keep your lower back flat. Don’t hunch unless, like ab curls, it’s part of the motion. Even then, do what’s right for your body.

Remember it’s only a warmup. A good burn is a great feeling, but if you can’t lift your arms after, you might affect your other training negatively. Be very careful of what’s in your blind spots, or behind you. Notice that for the high and low diagonal movement I have to clear the racked squat bar.

I use a Nordic Grip on the handles. This is probably the best way to use it, since it’s originally intended for Nordic ski training. But whatever works for you, just grab the handles and go.

Concept2 SkiErg warmup for full body cardio
Warm up for full body cardio on the SkiErg

The Concept2 SkiErg is a little expensive to use only for an upper body warmup. I generally do a few 15 minute sprints at level 10 (max level) every week for cross training, as well as endurance training for Ice Climbing. I noticed a huge difference in my endurance last season after using it in the Fall prior. I’m looking for even better results this season, having worked my way up in levels over the Summer.

If you have a Concept2 SkiErg and want to share your own warmup videos, please post them to my Facebook Page and share with all of us. We’d love to see what you have for us.

Training Logs – October Part One

While writing my book, recently released on Kindle Elbrus, My Waterloo (Seven Summits Quest) I adjusted my program slightly to emphasize weights and cut down on cardio quite a bit. This is the first half of October.

Training Logs for early October

Saturday October 13
Hike: 5.8 miles up Keystone Gulch 600′ elevation

Thursday October 11
I: 3:00
Rest Day

Wednesday October 10
I: 2:00
High Box Squat: 25 @ BW; 155; 205; 235; 235 lb
Incline Bench Press: 2 x 25 @ 45 lb
Low Row: 2 x 25 @ 45 lb
ITM: 787′
.40 mi – 24:06 – 40% – (0.996 ave.) – [60:15 pace] – 844.8′ – (2103/35.05 vert per hour/minute)

training log - recording my run up to Muir in 2010
Running to Camp Muir on Rainier in 2010 when I first began using a training log

Tuesday October 9
I: 2:30
FS: L8 – 18:00 – 2577′
GHR-Poles: 25
Superset: 5 x {
Parallel Box Squat: 5 @ 155 -red
Shoulder Curl-Press: 10 @ bar+10lb
}
Standing Pullup Pulse: 100
Standing Chinup Pulse: 50
ITM: -421′
2.00 mi – 25:20 – -4% – (4.737 ave.) – [12:40 pace] – -422.4′ – (-1000/-16.67 vert per hour/minute)

Monday October 8
I: 2:)0
Sumo Good Morning: 25 @ 45 lb
Hyper/RC: 25
Superset: 4 x {
Medium Box Squat: 5 @ 155 lb – red
SLDL: 5 @ 155 lb
Machine Lat Pulldown: 25 @ L6
DB Side Shoulder: 25 @ 7.5 lb ea
}
ITM: 636′
.815 mi – 25:00 – 15% – (1.956 ave.) – [30:40 pace] – 645.48′ – (1549/25.82 vert per hour/minute)

training logs show hikes with the kids
In my Training Logs I list family hikes without too many details

Sunday October 7
I: 2:30
FS: L8 – 12:00 – 1872′
18″ box – side step: 25 ea w/poles
GHR-Poles: 25
High Box Squat: 25 @ 65/115/155/205 lb
Incline Bench Press: 3 x 25 @ 45 lb
Inverted Row: 5
Hopping Pullup from 12″ box: 100
Blast Strap inverted fly: 2 x 10
Straight Arm Rope Pressdown: 10 @ L3
1-Arm Hopping Pullup from 12″ box: 50 ea.

Saturday October 6
I: 3:00
FS: L8 – 24:49 – 4000′
ITM: 40% – 24:12 – .511 mi – 1000′
.511 mi – 24:12 – 40% – (1.267 ave.) – [47:21 pace] – 1079.232′ – (2676/44.6 vert per hour/minute)

Training Log for using a jacobs ladder
Jacobs Ladder is JL: in my Training Log abbreviations

Friday October 5
I: 2:30
Bench Press pin 9: 10 @ 45/95; 2 x 10 @ 145 lb
Vertical Row: 4 x 10 @ 90 lb
Sumo Hopping Pullups: 4 x 25 (no box)
Ski-Erg: L5 – 9:00 – 620m
DB Shoulder side/front/rear: 25 @ 10 lb ea.
ITM: 5% – 30:00 – 2.049 – 540′
2.049 mi – 30:00 – 5% – (4.098 ave.) – [14:38 pace] – 540.936′ – (1082/18.03 vert per hour/minute)

Thursday October 4
I: 3:00
FS: L8 – 24:00 – 3455′
GHR-Poles: 16
18″ box rear step w/poles: 16 ea
Parallel Box Squat: 5 @ 65; 5 @ 115 -folded red ; 5 x 5 @ 115 -red

Training Logs record my daily mileage
Preparing for a half marathon I record my daily mileage in my training logs

Wednesday October 3
I: 3:00
Body said “Rest Day”

Tuesday October 2
I: 3:00
Safetybar Top Partial Squat pin 17: 10 @ 65; 25 @ 155; 4 x 25 @ 245 lb
Safetybar Standing Calf Raise: 25 @ 155 lb
ITM: 3% – 49:00 – 3.363 – 532′
3.363 mi – 49:00 – 3% – (4.118 ave.) – [14:34 pace] – 532.6992′ – (652/10.87 vert per hour/minute)

Monday October 1
I: 2:30
Hopping Dip: 3 x 100
Hopping Pullup/Chinup: 2 x 100 @ 6″ box; 100 @ 12″ box
DB Shoulder Side: 3 x 25
ITM: 20% – 24:00 – .54 mi – 559′
.54 mi – 24:00 – 20% – (1.35 ave.) – [44:27 pace] – 570.24′ – (1426/23.76 vert per hour/minute)

FS: L8 – 24:00 – 3091′

training log - Back at twelve percent fat
12% bodyfat rear view

Sunday September 30
I: 2:30
Safetybar Standing Calf Raise: 25 @ bw; 16 @ 65; 3 x 16 @ 95 lb
Safetybar Box Squat: 10 @ bw/65 lb; 3 x 10 @ 95 lb
ITM: 4% – 25:05 – 1.64 mi – 344′
1.64 mi – 25:05 – 4% – (3.923 ave.) – [15:18 pace] – 346.368′ – (829/13.81 vert per hour/minute)

Training After Elbrus

For the past few weeks after my attempt on Elbrus, a volcano in Russia and one of the Seven Summits, I have been working to regain my strength and fitness, and I have to admit, this is probably the fastest I’ve ever gotten back into the groove for training after an expedition.

Family Hike for Fall Colors
Taking the kids up the canyon to view the Fall colors

In addition to doing some heavier weights in this training cycle, I’ve also done some family hikes and road bike rides with my 11 year old since returning from Elbrus. It’s fall here in Utah right now, and the colors are just awesome, with a lot of reds this year. I’m looking forward to going out to Colorado during the next school holiday, and wanting to run the Grizzly Ridge to Torrey’s and maybe Buffalo.

Post Elbrus Training Stats from my private Blog

Saturday September 29
ITM: [1961′]
1.00 mi – 50:00 – 40% – (1.2 ave.) – [50:000 pace] – 2112′ – (2534/42.24 vert per hour/minute)
Stairmaster: 48:00 – 65 s/m – 2080.00 ft. – 0.44 mi.
ITM: [-250′]
2.37 mi – 24:00 – -2% – (5.925 ave.) – [10:08 pace] – -250.272′ – (-626/-10.43 vert per hour/minute)
Bike Ride: 15.3 mi.

Friday September 28
I: 3:00
Freestrider: L8 – 14:30 – 2000′
GHR: 17 (concentrated no poles)
Safetybar Sumo Partial Goodmorning: 25 @ 65 lb
Safetybar Sumo High Box Squat: 25 @ bw / 65 / 115 / 165 / 195 / 215 !!!
Band Sissy Squat: 25 @ green
Leg Extension: 25 ea @ 30 lb

Thursday September 27
I: 2:30
Ski-Erg: L5 – 9:00 – 1296 meters – 5.369 mph – 11:11 min/mi – 2.4 meters/second
Superset: 2 x {
Hopping Dip: 100
Hopping Pullup: 100
Hyper/RC: 25
}
Superset: {
Bench Press: 5 @ 135 -purple; 5 x 5 @ 160 -purple
Horizontal Row: 5 @ 90 lb; 5 x 5 @ 125 lb
}
Superset: 3 x {
Suprabar Shoulder Curl/Press: 10 @ bar+ 20 lb
Inverted Row: 10
Neutral Grip Chinup: 5 singles from standing
}
ITM: [1182′]
4.482 mi – 62:00 – 5% – (4.337 ave.) – [13:50 pace] – 1183.248′ – (1145/19.08 vert per hour/minute)

Wednesday September 26
I: 2:30
Freestrider: L8 – 7:06 – 1000′
GHR-Poles: 5 x 10 @ bw
Superset: 5 x {
Safetybar Parallel Box Squat: 6 @ 65/115 lb; 3 x 6 @ 135 lb
DB Incline Chest Press: 10 @ 25 lb ea
}
Sumo SLDL: 5 x 5 @ 155 lb
ITM: [247′]
2.35 mi – 30:00 – 2% – (4.7 ave.) – [12:46 pace] – 248.16′ – (496/8.27 vert per hour/minute)
Stairmaster: 25:00 – 60 s/m – 1000.00 ft. – 0.21 mi.

Tuesday September 25
I: 2:30
Ski-Erg: L5 – 9:00 – 1263 meters – 5.232 mph – 11:28 min/mi – 2.339 meters/second
Hopping Dip/Pullup: 100 ea
DB Shoulder (side/front/rear): 25 ea @ 5 lb ea
Bench Press: 25 @ 45 lb
Horizontal Row: 25 @ 90 lb
Seated Goodmorning (curl/oblique): 25 @ bw
Safetybar Goodmorning: 5 @ 65 lb
Trapbar Deadlift: 5 @ 145 lb
Stairmaster: 10:00 – 60 s/m – 400.00 ft. – 0.09 mi.

Monday September 24
Ski-Erg: L5 – 9:00 – 1257 meters – 5.207 mph – 11:31 min/mi – 2.328 meters/second
Hyper/RC: 25 ea
DB Shoulder (side/front/rear) 25 ea @ 5 lb ea
Leg Extension: 25 ea @ 20 lb
Hunchbacks: 25
Safetybar High Box Squat: 25 @ 65/115/165/185 lb
Safetybar Standing Calf: 25 @ 65 lb
ITM: [2513′]
1.28 mi – 49:09 – 40% – (1.563 ave.) – [38:24 pace] – 2703.36′ – (3300/55 vert per hour/minute)

Sunday September 23
I: 2:30
Superset: 2 x {
Hyper: 25
Roman Chair: 25
Hopping Pullup: 100
Hopping Dip: 100
Ski Erg: 1:30 – L5 – 247/232 M
}
Pulse Pushup: 40
DB Lateral Shoulder: 2 x 25 @ 5 lb ea
Bench Press: 2 x 25 @ 45 lb
Inverted Row Scapular Contraction: 25
ITM:  [595′]
.58 mi – 25:20 – 20% – (1.374 ave.) – [43:41 pace] – 612.48′ – (1451/24.18 vert per hour/minute)

Freestrider: L8 – 23:40 – 4000′

Saturday September 22
I: 2:30
Hopping Chinup/Pullup: 2 x 100
Hopping Dip: 2 x 100
Machine Ab Curl: 50 @ L6; 25 @ L4
Superset: 2 x {
Inverted Row: 10
Elevated Pushup: 10
}
Bike Ride: 7.6 mi (stats?)

Friday September 21
Zercher Safetybar High Box Squat: 10 @ 65 lb
Safetybar High Box Squat: 2 x 10 @ 155 lb; 2 x 10 @ 205 lb; 5 @ 225 lb (pulled oblique)
Bailed on rest of workout today

Thursday September 20
I: 2:30
Superset: 5 x {
Bench Press: 5 @ 135 lb -purple
Suprabar Horizontal Row: 5 @ 115 lb
Suprabar Curl/Press: 5 @ bar+30 lb
Wrist Roller: 5 lb (both ways)
}
Superset: 3 x {
Inverted Row: 10
Incline Press: 10 @ 25 lb ea
Facepull: 10 @ L2/L3
}
Superset: 3 x {
Assisted Pullup: 10 @ blue (knees)
Tricep Rope: 10 @ L3
}
ITM: [-227′]
2.16 mi – 24:00 – -2% – (5.4 ave.) – [11:07 pace] – -228.096′ – (-570/-9.5 vert per hour/minute)

Wednesday September 19
I: 2:30
Blaststrap Sissy Squat: 10
Superset: 5 x {
Straightleg Deadlift: 5 @ 135 lb
Safetybar Full Squat: 5 @ 65 lb
}
Freestrider: L6 – 24:00 – 3445′

Tuesday September 18
Superset: 8 total sets {
Bench Press: 25 @ 45 lb; 5 @ 135 -reds; 2 @ 185 -purples; 5 x 3 @ 185 -purples/reds
Suprabar Horizontal Row: 8 x 10 @ 95 lb
}
Superset: 2 x {
Suprabar Curl/Press: 10 @ bar+20 lb
Assisted Pullup: 25 @ blue
}
Incline DB Press: 25 @ 22.5 lb ea
ITM: [2400′]
1.22 mi – 52:04 – 40% – (1.406 ave.) – [42:41 pace] – 2576.64′ – (2969/49.49 vert per hour/minute)

Monday September 17
Freestrider: L10 – 7:29 – 1000′
GHR-Poles: 25
Band Goodmorning: 2 x 25 @ purple band
Parallel Box Squat: 10 @ bw/65; 2 x 10 @ 85 lb
Trapbar Deadlift: 5 @ 145/195; 3 x 10 @ 225 lb
ITM: [-168′]
1.6 mi – 24:00 – -2% – (4 ave.) – [15:000 pace] – -168.96′ – (-422/-7.04 vert per hour/minute)

Sunday September 16
Freestrider: L8 – 12:00 – 1511′
KB Swings – not recorded
GHR-Poles: 5 x 10
Superset 2 x {
Machine Abs: 25 @ L6
Hanging Knee-up: 10
Incline DB Chest Press: 25 @ 20 lb ea.
Rear Delt Fly: 15 @ 5 lb ea
}
ITM: [2410′]
1.23 mi – 54:00 – 40% – (1.367 ave.) – [43:54 pace] – 2597.76′ – (2886/48.11 vert per hour/minute)

Saturday September 15
I: 3:30
Freestrider: L6 – 8:00 – 1106′
KB Swings 25 ea multiple angles
GHR-Poles 5 x 10
Trapbar Deadlift: 5 x 10 @ 145 lb
Safetybar Seated Goodmorning: 12 @ 65
High Box Squat: 5 @ 65/155 lb; 5 x 5 @ 205 lb
Assisted Pullup: 25 @ Blue Band
Seated Calf Raise: 25 @ 90 lb

Friday September 14
Hyper/RC: 25
Hanging Knee-up: 2 x 12
Machine Ab Curl: 2 x 25 @ L10
Superset: 2 x {
Bench Press: 25 @ 45 lb
Seated Suprabar Shoulder Curl/Press: 2 @ bar
Rope Row: 25 @ L4
}
Assisted Pullup: 4 x 12 @ Blue Band (Standing)
Strap Tricep Press: 10 @ L4
Supported Tricep Dip: 10 @ bw -legs
Inverted Row: 10
ITM: [632′]
.81 mi – 25:00 – 15% – (1.944 ave.) – [30:52 pace] – 641.52′ – (1540/25.66 vert per hour/minute)

Thursday September 13
I: 2:00
Hyper/RC: 25
Blast Strap Sissy Squat: 25
Safetybar High Box Squat: 25 @ 65 lb; 17 @ 115 lb; 12 @ 155 lb; 5 x 10 @ 185 lb
Side Abs: 25 ea @ 5 lb (handle)
Single leg high box: 25 ea @ bw
Twisting Abs: 25 @ bw
ITM: [-308′]
1.46 mi – 25:00 – -4% – (3.504 ave.) – [17:07 pace] – -308.352′ – (-740/-12.33 vert per hour/minute)