Category: Training Log

Trailrunning Week in Photos

On Monday I ran on the Bonneville Shoreline Trail in Utah along the foot of the Wasatch Mountains East of Utah Lake near Orem Utah. I did 7.92 miles and 250′ vertical after my 7+ hour drive from Colorado.

Bonneville Shoreline Trail overlooking Utah Lake. Local say BST.
Bonneville Shoreline Trail overlooking Utah Lake. Local say BST.
Movescount Stats for my BST Run on Monday
Movescount Stats for my BST Run on Monday

The next two days, Tuesday and Wednesday I did an Incline Treadmill workout and a couple Stairmaster Stepmill workouts. I forgot to bring my whiteboard home with my stats on it, but the Incline Treadmill was:

Time: 30:01
Distance: .548
Incline: 30%
Elevation Gain: 868.03′
Average MPH: 1.095
Average Pace: 54:46
Vertical/Hour: 1735′
Vertical/Minute: 28.92′
VAM: 528.9

Console Report from my Incline Treadmill workout on Tuesday
Console Report from my Incline Treadmill workout on Tuesday

If I remember correctly I got in over 2500′ on the Stepmill, and next time I’m in Utah I’ll get it updated here.

On Thursday I went up to the Saddle on Mount Olympus, the iconic peak prominent on the East side of the valley near the large REI store. I tried going up the gravel chute scramble to the summit, but was going two steps up and three steps back so decided that a trip to the Saddle was a good workout and returned down. I’m glad I did. That first half mile down was really hard on my knees. 5.89 miles and 3700′ of vertical.

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Movescount Stats from Mount Olympus in Salt Lake City
Movescount Stats from Mount Olympus in Salt Lake City

That same afternoon then I returned to Colorado in a thunderstorm with lightning bolts hitting the peaks around Avon and Vail.

On Friday Morning I went out for a trip up Mount Royal, one of my favorite local steep ascents up the anvil-like prow overlooking Frisco Colorado Main Street. The trail was still under a lot of snow. It’s been a very cool wet spring here with lots of snow. An avalanche swept through the trees just left of the trail and covered an intersection and I ended up on the very steep avalanche debris and had to work hard to avoid postholing. When I neared the saddle I realized I was in the wrong drainage and tried to go over and through the trees but between the steep rough terrain and the deep snow between the pines I descended and then found the correct trail. I followed it up for a bit but then had to bail after postholing in steep wet slush like a snowcone. I did 3.34 miles and 1286′ vertical.

Avalanche debris on Mount Royal in Frisco CO
Avalanche debris on Mount Royal in Frisco CO
Snowy trail weaving through the trees on Mount Royal by Frisco CO
Snowy trail weaving through the trees on Mount Royal by Frisco CO
Knee deep post holing tracks on Mount Royal snowcone snow
Knee deep post holing tracks on Mount Royal snowcone snow
Movescount Stats for Mount Royal in Frisco CO
Movescount Stats for Mount Royal in Frisco CO

I kind of felt like that wasn’t quite workout enough, and was going to go for a cycle ride that Friday Evening but decided to go for a second run up the Keystone Gulch Road, one of my favorites. I wanted to go pretty fast overall, in spite of my cold (got a cold from a traveling relative that really packed up my lungs and sinus) and sore knees from Olympus (actually since a pavement run a few weeks ago my knees have been a bit troublesome). I ended up with 1.46 miles and 120′ vertical.

Keystone Gulch Road Fast Run on Friday Evening
Keystone Gulch Road Fast Run on Friday Evening

The next day, Saturday I set a goal of 10 miles and I was curious about the Aqueduct Trail going from a pond crossing about a half mile up the road around to The Ranches subdivision above the golf course and stables. That was a blast. After bushwhacking around some snow, I was on singletrack going very quickly for a while in the area before the houses. Eventually the track gently ascended a hill about where I thought you might cross over back on top of the ridge overlooking the Gulch but it was all under water. I skirted it slowly for a while but then decided it was going to go on forever and returned to the gulch road. I came across a couple of mountain bikers who reported seeing a bear along the singletrack on their way so I took out my earbuds and took off the sunglasses just in case. At the road I headed up to a little ways past the 2 mile marker, having to leap across a 2′ runnel of water crossing the road swiftly entering the creek. I returned to the crossroad trail head with 10.21 miles and 700′ vertical gain.

Keystone Gulch 10 mile run from Saturday via Movescount
Keystone Gulch 10 mile run from Saturday via Movescount
The Aqueduct pipe and trail along the cliffs heading toward the Stables at Keystone Resort
The Aqueduct pipe and trail along the cliffs heading toward the Stables at Keystone Resort
Singletrack trail near The Ranches overlooking the River Run Golf Course at Keystone Resort
Singletrack trail near The Ranches overlooking the River Run Golf Course at Keystone Resort

I ended up with 29.368 miles and 6824.03′ of vertical for this week. Add in at least 2500′ of ascent via Stairmaster and that’s over 9000′ of gain for the week. In spite of my achy knees and stuffed lungs and head. It was a great week.

How to Log and Compare Workouts

In my most recent book The 100 Calorie Diet Plan (available in Print on Amazon andCreatespace, and for Kindle and for Nook ebooks) I explain briefly how to log your workouts and then make steady incremental progress from workout to workout. For a more complete explanation and a better example than in the book, here’s two of my recent training sessions compared side-by-side.

Leg Day Training - two side by side workouts
Leg Day Training – two side by side workouts

If you’re already training, I hope you’re keeping some type of training journal. If not, you have one now. Put your data in your nutrition and success tracking journal we started in the previous chapter. The plan now is to log everything, minutes, miles, feet, pounds, sets, reps. If you don’t know what you’re doing now, how can you know if you do more later? or worse, less? I like to have as much meaningful information as possible, with a focus on meaningful. — The 100 Calorie Diet Plan, Page 13

I use the Color Note App on my phone while training, just because it’s really handy and I can share it to my home PC or online document app whenever I want to compile stats. I have developed a shorthand over the years to make my logging easier, even though the auto-complete on the phone should make it simple to type. Here’s a quick guide to my shorthand, and some specific terms used on this example:

Log Workouts: glossary

Hyper: Back Hyperextension, laying forward in the machine bend toward to floor then up to a straight body
RC: Roman Chair (usually done on the Back Hyperextension bench) ab training motion
Gravitron: An assisted pullup/dip machine.
PU: Pullup
Cybex: Equipment Manufacturer, a style of strength training machine
RDL: Romanian Dead Lift – deadlift done from standing to the floor and return to standing, typically with straight legs
Leg Ext: Leg Extension, straightening the legs under load
Leg Curl: Retracting the legs to folded under load
Ab Curl: a type of situp in which the spine is flexed to a c-shape curve
Delt: short for deltoid, the shoulder muscles

First I get core out of the way with Back Hyperextension and Roman Chair Abs.

I begin the rest of the workout by warming up with the Gravitron pullup with a 130 pound assist. This gives me about 50 pounds of load. I do this about every other workout, if not more, since these are climbing-specific muscles and I need to do a light duty set frequently.

Cybex Fly Machine for Chest and Delts
Cybex Fly Machine for Chest and Delts

I then do the Chest and Rear Delt Fly. I did chest on my previous workout and this helps stretch out the muscles and flush blood and toxins through for faster recovery.

Romanian Dead Lifts are a great “Posterior Chain” workout, working the glutes (butt) and hamstrings (back of legs). These are important muscles for everything, but particularly upward travel at higher speed.

Romanian Dead Lifts from a stand on the platform
Romanian Dead Lifts from a stand on the platform

Then for squats. I am doing Power Lifter style squats, with the bar placed low on the back, centered over the upper notch in the scapulae and with the legs fairly wide, going as far down as flexibility allows. Some people only squat down about 4″ and this allows a lot of weight to be used, so if you try going all the way down, keep in mind that you might not be using as much weight as you would think.

The view from the row of Cybex Equipment at the Breckenridge Recreation Center
The view from the row of Cybex Equipment at the Breckenridge Recreation Center

I use the calf sled since there isn’t any other calf machine at this facility and I’m not really stable doing them without a power rack for safety. A calf sled is a seat on sliding rails with weight underneath. You lift the seat on the rails by pushing with your toes on a plate.

Finally I do a couple of finishing moves on the Leg Extension and Leg Curl machines with a lot of reps at a moderate weight. In between stuff and as it seems appropriate I also do a lot of stretching. This is controversial but I’ve done it for years and believe it helps me recover faster.

Leg Extension:

Leg Curl:

If you look at the side-by-side comparison you’ll see that I’ve made good progress between the two sessions, about a week apart. In another post we’ll look at the math, but I do cover that in the book, if you want to skip ahead and do it yourself. Remember to log workouts if you want to know for sure what you’re really doing.

Remember that by logging your training, you are making it measurable, and adding to your accountability. Measuring is the “M” in SMART – the classic goal setting strategy. Some people need professional help with this to ensure greater success faster. I know I could have halved the time I spent losing my 60 pounds and getting ready for my adventure goals had I gotten professional help early.

Training Log: Bonneville Shoreline Trail 12 Nov 2013

Last night I went to bed with a crazy idea. To do a 5K PR on the BST, or Bonneville Shoreline Trail. Along the Wasatch Front of Utah we just call it the BST for simplicity. Everyone who runs or bikes knows it. Here in Utah County it’s pretty dry and barren for the most part. It’s made up of various jeep roads along the base of Mount Timpanogos here in the Northern part of the County. Further South it has a few more trees on it, down by Rock Canyon.

Just after completing my 5K PR on the BST
Just after completing my 5K PR on the BST

I parked at a church near the Cedar Hills Golf Club, since they don’t mind much and the paved rec path is there to access the dirt road. I walked about a quarter mile to warm up, then hit the button on Strava [results] and my Watch. I monitored my progress closely, with the Pace View on the watch to make sure I stayed below a 10:00 pace, with a target of 32:00 minutes for my PR.

There were a few steep but short hills and a few longer gentler uphill grades, and I had to walk a few times. Then at 1.6 miles I turned around and gave it a little more speed. My legs and lungs were sore and I came in at the starting line, about 3.2 miles and then tapered to a walk to let my heart rate decrease. When I uploaded the run to Strava it did in fact meet my goal at 31:25 for the 5K PR.

Later I looked at my Polar results and my heart rate was over 160 for almost the entire return 1.6 miles. Awesome job, if I do say so myself. Below is the GPS track from Strava and then a gallery of some of my results graphs from Strava and Polar.

[map style=”width: auto; height:500px; margin:20px 0px 20px 0px; border: 1px solid black;” gpx=”http://sevensummitsbody.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/BST PG 5k 12 November 2013.gpx”]

Map and Splits
Map and Splits
Pace Overview - Elevation and Pace
Pace Overview – Elevation and Pace
Pace Analysis - Splits
Pace Analysis – Splits
Pace Analysis - Smoothed
Pace Analysis – Smoothed
Pace Distribution based on Tempo
Pace Distribution based on Tempo
Polar Heart Rate (in the red zone)
Polar Heart Rate (in the red zone)
Polar Heart Rate Zone Displayed
Polar Heart Rate Zone Displayed

Training Log: Squaw Peak 02 November 2013

I was going to be in Utah for family business and had contacted fellow Team Seven Summits Quest member Jen Hamilton to see if she could do a run on it. She was planning on starting around 7, and I couldn’t be there before 9, so I thought we could hook up on the trail.

Charles Miske and Jen Hamilton below Squaw Peak overlooking Provo Utah
Charles Miske and Jen Hamilton below Squaw Peak overlooking Provo Utah

I had two days of rest after my slow winter conditions run on Quandary, so I was hoping I could beat my last PR on Squaw. I took off from the parking lot and tried hard to run up the road, then gravel road, then narrow four wheel drive road up to the fork in the trail for Squaw, about 1.5 miles from the gate to the parking lot.

Squaw Peak map with Splits
Squaw Peak map with Splits

I ran about a 10:00 pace for the paved section of road, then settled into about a 15:00 uphill walk with a few steep sections of slower walking, trying hard not to drift below a 20:00 pace. I figured with a two hour head start I might be running into Jen somewhere up the fork, probably on her way down. I looked at my watch and saw that I was running a few minutes slower than I thought I needed to be for a PR.

About a half mile from the summit of Squaw Peak [photo by Jen Hamilton]
About a half mile from the summit of Squaw Peak [photo by Jen Hamilton]

The trail devolved into slimy mud over frozen hard dirt with some ice and snow in shady places. With the fallen leaves it was a bit slippery in places. I finally ran into Jen about a half mile from the summit as she was descending. We talked for a minute and I checked my watch. I felt like I was about four minutes off from a record, and after a couple minutes we decided to meet on my way down and I ran hard for the summit.

Squaw Peak Summit
Squaw Peak Summit

I checked my watch and was a bit fuzzy, since I had started it at the car, and there was a couple minute walk to the gate before the Strava Segment started. I hung out for a minute, took a couple of pictures, then headed back down. It was a bit more slippery going down, and I fell once, but no damage, so I kept on. Jen was moving pretty fast going down, and I ran into her about a quarter mile from the fork to the road and we went down that last steep narrow dirt trough together.

Frosty branches in the frozen mud
Frosty branches in the frozen mud

We continued on back to the car moving at a reasonably fast clip, but not running like I’d done on my last Squaw Peak training run. We discussed Elbrus Race 2014, possible gear selections and training methods, nutrition and her health and training goals.

It wasn’t until a while later, when I synced my Strava app that I discovered I’d achieved a handful of PR’s on this one. I was surprised, but quite pleased. One thing I’d like to add here is that I was not using trekking poles on this run, so I was using my arms to pump hard on the way up. Not sure if it helped or not though.

Strava Overview with PR's for Squaw Peak Run
Strava Overview with PR’s for Squaw Peak Run

I have been doing the Hoka Vertical Challenge on Strava too, which is one reason I’ve been doing a lot of vertical training this past week, instead of my usual runs on Keystone Gulch Road. I managed to top 4000 meters this week, which is a lot of vertical feet, especially considering that quite a bit of that was accomplished above 4000 meters on a Colorado Fourteener.

Hoka One One Demand More Vertical Challenge 4000 meter achievement
Hoka One One Demand More Vertical Challenge 4000 meter achievement

I’m heading back to Colorado now, and not quite sure what my vertical achievement goal will be for Monday after a rest day on Sunday. It will be exciting though to make this training goal. Here is a collection of images about my training from Strava Reports:

[map style=”width: auto; height:500px; margin:20px 0px 20px 0px; border: 1px solid black;” gpx=”http://sevensummitsbody.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/Squaw Peak 02 November 2013.gpx”]

Training Log: Torreys Peak via Kelso Ridge – 17 August 2013

I’ve been wanting to do this one for a couple years now but haven’t quite gotten around to it. This past week I’d done a couple more extreme trail runs. I did a 17.5 mile up Keystone Gulch to the Colorado Trail to the Aquaduct Trail for Breckenridge and back. I was lost.

I also did a double on Mount Royal overlooking Frisco Colorado. I was pretty wasted so I was looking for something that my friend, climbing partner, and Team Seven Summits Quest mate Todd Gilles and I could do together that was also extreme, but would allow us to go a bit slower than we have been in our training for Elbrus Race 2013.

Todd Gilles rock climbing on Kelso Ridge
Todd Gilles rock climbing on Kelso Ridge

We met in Keystone at about 6:50 and drove together in my higher clearance vehicle to the Grays Peak Trailhead up Stevens Gulch. The Grizzly Gulch Fork parking was completely overparked and as we went up the road through the private land area we ran into a long line of bumper to bumper cars parked along the side. We stopped to ask and no one knew for sure if there were spaces up at the trailhead. I decided to risk it, thinking there would be parking along the road to the mining area where I’d camped several years before.

Sure enough, there was parking for us and we took off up the trail. It was pretty obvious that many of these hundreds of people don’t get out much. They weren’t at all experienced with faster “hikers” on the same trail. We made it to the fork to Kelso Ridge in pretty good time in spite of that. We took off up the ridge and for the most part it was loose gravel and dirt with a few steep gullies of third class rock, with maybe one or two fifth class moves. I think if you were cautious you could find a way to make it easier.

We didn’t really push for speed and stayed behind a few people that we used as routefinders for a while until they stopped for lunch. Then we came to the Knife-edge. This was classic. It’s a steep point about 50′ long along the ridge top. The slabs drop a few hundred feet both directions and most people I have heard slide along on their crotch. Some more brave people just walk on it. I was not brave that day. Todd was a bit faster than me. I think his Merrel minimum trail runners had better stick than my Salomon XA-Pro. They felt like they were sliding off every little foothold.

Happy to be on top. Todd Gilles and Charles Miske after climbing Kelso Ridge on Torreys
Happy to be on top. Todd Gilles and Charles Miske after climbing Kelso Ridge on Torreys

The last bit was a scree slog sometimes on hands and knees. At the top we hung out and ate and drank and did pics and videos. On the way down we saw hundreds of people along the trail. Most coming up quite late, but some going down. We got behind some really slow people, even for the slow pace we were going at, so at a switchback with a fork I managed to run around everyone and we started booking it down the trail.

We passed everyone. Not a single other person, even those dressed as trail runners, passed us. I think it took only a little over an hour to descend back to the car. I know I had a lot of fun sliding and jumping and even falling once to avoid running into a dog in the middle of the trail that didn’t notice me approaching.

Torreys via Kelso Ridge – Strava Stats

Torreys via Kelso Ridge 17 AUG 2013 on Strava - overview
Torreys via Kelso Ridge 17 AUG 2013 on Strava – overview

When I uploaded my stats Strava associated our stats together, Todd’s and mine. Oddly we were 20 minutes apart though we hit the summit within a minute of each other. I think it was because whoever created the segment pinned the summit in a different spot. I just sat down at the cairn and Todd wandered around, so likely he passed through the pinned segment end before I did. In any case here are the Strava stats [CLICK HERE]

Torreys via Kelso Ridge Map

[map style=”width: auto; height:500px; margin:20px 0px 20px 0px; border: 1px solid black;” gpx=”http://sevensummitsbody.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/Torreys_14er_via_Kelso_Ridge_17_August_2013.gpx”]

Training Log: Keystone Gulch Form Run – 19 August 2013

For this installment of Training Log I’m sharing my run this morning 19 August 2013. It was the first day of school so everyone was up early. I got out of the condo at 7:00 AM and it was pretty cold still. It was damp too, having rained quite a bit yesterday evening.

Trail run up Keystone Gulch cold morning
Trail run up Keystone Gulch cold morning

I was still pretty tired from my big runs and climbs last week, and decided that if I can’t go fast I might as well work on my form. I tried to make nice fast paced little circles with my feet and strike gently for as long as I could. I also tried to reduce my stops, but ended up pausing to take a few pics and vids.

Strava for the Keystone Gulch Easy Form run 19 August 2013
Strava for the Keystone Gulch Easy Form run 19 August 2013

I had planned to run at least a 10k, and it was a bit of a mental game to do that, since the road between 2.5 and 3.0 miles seems steep compared to the rest of it. Here’s the Strava Overview for this run [CLICK HERE]

Below is the Keystone Gulch Map View

[map style=”width: auto; height:500px; margin:20px 0px 20px 0px; border: 1px solid black;” gpx=”http://sevensummitsbody.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/Keystone Gulch Easy (form) 19 August 2014.gpx”]

Training Log: Squaw Peak UT – 8 July 2013

In my training for Elbrus Race 2013 I have done a lot of uphill “running” or “really fast walking” as I like to say to some people I pass on the trails. I’ve done Squaw Peak, just outside of Provo Utah up Rock Canyon a few times. I took the kids up there once in the fall. It was really pretty.

Here is the GPS track from Strava. When I first did this run I placed pretty highly out of those who’ve done it. In the meantime nearly ten others have squeezed in with better times. That’s the fun thing about Strava – your placing is in near real-time. CLICK HERE for more info on it.

It was a while ago, but I remember how hard it was to keep cranking away on that last uphill stretch. I was surprised to see a lot of rock climbing anchors at the summit. I suppose they’ve managed to put in some more long routes on that face. I’ll have to see if they’re anything I can climb.

Squaw Peak Segments on Strava
Squaw Peak Segments on Strava

[map style=”width: auto; height:500px; margin:20px 0px 20px 0px; border: 1px solid black;” gpx=”http://sevensummitsbody.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/Squaw_Peak_08_July_2013.gpx”]

Training Log Example – Weekly Blog Log

The below is an example of a training log taken from a Blogger Blog I share with my wife to track our daily workouts, eating, and goals. I use a little shorthand, since I’ve been doing this for years. Each day immediately after each exercise I write what I do on a small whiteboard I got from Target for $1 in those little bargain aisles just inside the door.

Training Log on Whiteboard
Write Your Workout Immediately on a Whiteboard

I can usually get 2-3 days to a board if I’m doing weights, or 5 to a board if I’m doing just cardio.

Right now I’m in full-on training mode for Elbrus Race 2012 (still not locked in, so not totally committed unfortunately – the visa and flight issues at the end of August are causing me moderate stress as I strive to overcome those obstacles). Hence I am not doing heavy weights, but am going for high volume of light weight to flush blood through my muscles and build endurance and vascularity. (some research has shown an increase in acclimatization with greater vascularity)

I really suggest you log your training for best results. I use a blog that I’ve marked as “Private” and given access (by logging in) to myself and my wife. There are a slew of social sites now where you can do the same thing and share it with all your friends, but I’ve been doing this longer than there even were such things, and I really don’t want to share my every day sweating, despite some of more frequent post topics.

One of my favorite aspects of the online blog version of tracking my workouts is that I can give them labels or tags, so I can find groups of exercises with common themes like “going for maximum vertical per hour” or “squat day” etc. and compare where I am now with where I was a year or two ago.

Angie Lat Pulldown
Angie on the Lat Tower of the Power Rack

Key to log below:
I: Inversion Table
ITM: Incline Treadmill
SLDL: Straight Leg Deadlifts
FS: Nordic Track Freestrider
RC: Roman Chair
DB: Dumbbell
M-: Combo Machine
GHR: Glute Ham Raise
xxxx’/yyyy’ left is from machine display, right is from calculator

Monday July 9

181.6 lb

I: 2:00
FS: L8 – 12:00 – 2000′
Box Stepping/GHR-Poles 25 ea
Stairmaster: 90:00 – 75 spm – 4500′

Daily Total Vertical: 6500′

Tuesday July 10

180.2 lb

I: 3:00
Incline Treadmill: [1800′ – ~mph – hands-free]
1.19 mi – 47:24 – 30% – (1.506 ave.) – [39:50 pace] – 1884.96′ – (2386/39.77 vert per hour/minute)

Superset: 2x {
Standing Wide Row: 25 @ L3
Box Squat: 10 @ 65 lb Safetybar
DB Shoulders: 25 @ 10 lb ea.
DB Fly: 25 @ 10 lb ea.
}

Hyper/RC: 25 ea
Side Plank: 30 seconds ea.

Incline Treadmill: [2000′ – 1.6 mph – hands-on]
1.32 mi – 49:27 – 30% – (1.602 ave.) – [37:28 pace] – 2090.88′ – (2537/42.28 vert per hour/minute)

Daily Total Vertical: 3800’/3974′

Wednesday July 11

182.0 lb

I: 3:00
FS: L8 – 12:00 – 2000′
ITM:  [2012′ – 1.6/7 mph – way hands-on]
1.33 mi – 47:00 – 30% – (1.698 ave.) – [35:20 pace] – 2106.72′ – (2689/44.82 vert per hour/minute)

Stairmaster: 36:00 – 80 spm – 1920′

Daily Total Vertical: 4012’/4106′

Thursday July 12

181.4 lb

I: 2:30
ITM: [2000′ – 1.6 mph – still too much hands-on]
1.32 mi – 44:48 – 30% – (1.768 ave.) – [33:56 pace] – 2090.88′ – (2800/46.67 vert per hour/minute)

Superset: 2 x {
Box Squat: 15 @ 65 lb
SLDL: 15 @ 145 lb
Seated Calf: 15 @ 85 lb
}

Stairmaster: 48:00 – 80 spm – 2560′
I: 3:00

Daily Total Vertical: 4560’/4650′

Friday July 13

183.4 (rice and popcorn and veggies and soup)

I: 2:30
FS: L6 – 12:25 – 2000′
12″ Box: side/rear/front stepping 25 ea; Pole Squat: 25 ea;
GHR – poles: 25  — way out!

ITM: [1000′ – 1.6 mph]
.67 mi – 24:54 – 30% – (1.614 ave.) – [37:10 pace] – 1061.28′ – (2557/42.62 vert per hour/minute)

Superset: 2 x {
M-LPD: 25 @ L5
M-Row: 25 @ L5
DB-Fly: 25 @ 10 lb ea
DB-Shoulder: 25 @ 10 lb ea
Buttup: 25
Partial Pushup: 25 !!
Swing DB-Bicep: 25 @ 10 ea.
}

Daily Total Vertical: 3000’/3061′

Saturday July 14

183.2

I: 2:30

ITM: [3374′ – 1.7/2.0]
2.225 mi – 72:00 – 30% – (1.854 ave.) – [32:22 pace] – 3524.4′ – (2937/48.95 vert per hour/minute)
Stairmaster: 48:00 – 100 spm – 3200′

Daily Total Vertical: 6574’/6724′

Weekly Total Vertical: 28,446′ / 29,015′