Month: June 2014

Reverse Hyper Core Training

Reverse Hyper is the name often given for the opposite of the Back Hyperextension. In the latter you stand in the foot pads with your heels held firmly in place. Then leaning the quads or the upper part of the front of your legs on pads you lean forward hinging at the hip toward the floor. You go down to approximately 45 to 60 degrees and then rise up to parallel or more above the ground.

Reverse Hyper on the bench named for the exercise
Reverse Hyper on the bench named for the exercise

With the Reverse Hyper you can use the special bench shown. You place your chest and torso on the bench with your hips extended out over the edge. Then you grasp the handles and hold yourself steady while hinging at the hip joint to lift your legs to above parallel to the floor. You then lower your legs under control to perpendicular below you.

In the video demonstration I’m doing sets of 12 with no additional weight. I’m lifting my heels up fairly high with a good degree of flexibility and mobility in my lower back.

Disclaimer: Obviously this might differ between individuals and is best determined by your own self-awareness or the advice of a qualified professional familiar with this movement and the requirements to perform it safely. Be careful and don’t become injured.

Reverse Hyper Video Demonstration:

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w8xyR6i97ho

This type of reverse hyper bench has a swing arm that you can slip around your ankles to add weight. The lever arm itself adds in about 5 pounds or so of resistance but it takes a little getting used to. If you want to add weight perhaps just using the empty lever tubing would be a good way to start to see if you like it or not.

I think you could also add ankle weights when you do the reverse hyper. For an exercise like this that I consider an accessory movement I prefer 3-6 sets of 12 with no or little weight added. An accessory movement supports another more primary movement, such as the RDL. Otherwise known as the Romanian Dead Lift this is itself an accessory movement for Squats and Deadlifts.

I’ve seen demos of the reverse hyper holding a dumbbell in between the toes of the feet, but I think this would be too dangerous for most normal people and recommend against it.

The “Superman Plank”, a bodyweight, no bench version of this, is one of the main core exercises in my Mountaineering Fitness: Beginner Training Manual INFO HERE

Hanging Knee Raises

Hanging Knee Raises are among my favorite core training exercises. I like to use the arm straps that connect to a power rack, or pull-up bar (or some other way to connect them).

Slip your arms into the straps until your elbows poke out the end and if your shoulder and elbow mobility allow, reach up and gently hang onto the large snap rings (carabiners) that you use to connect them to the rod). From there lift yourself up with your lats and abs until you’re hanging straight down from the straps.

Starting position for hanging knee raises with your elbows just coming out of the straps and hanging onto the carabiners loosely.
Starting position for hanging knee raises with your elbows just coming out of the straps and hanging onto the carabiners loosely.

For strict hanging knee raises you’ll need to avoid using momentum to accomplish the movement. Use your core to pull your knees up as high as you can without hurting your back. If you can gently tap your elbows with your knees, all the better. Again, without momentum, finish each rep of your hanging knee raises by lowering your legs and straighten them as you go down. Try to not touch the floor with your feet and try not to let your feet swing behind you. This will add momentum as you go forward and reduces the strictness of your hanging knee raises. Use tension in your core to slow the motion of the hanging knee raises at the bottom so that your feet stop just under you.

Upper position of the hanging knee raises with your knees touching the tips of your elbows using tension to pause to prevent the assistance of momentum.
Upper position of the hanging knee raises with your knees touching the tips of your elbows using tension to pause to prevent the assistance of momentum.

When you do these correctly and with proper tension in your core, you should only be able to do a dozen, give or take. If you can do a lot of hanging knee raises, you’re using momentum to assist the motion. This isn’t necessarily bad, since momentum and dynamic motion are valid means of training hanging knee raises, but you should mix it up and use them without momentum on a regular basis for best benefit to your core.

I recommend doing 5 sets of 10 to 12 hanging knee raises without momentum with every other workout session.

Hanging Knee Raises Video on Youtube:

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L6-CXiwoYVs

Disclaimer: If you have shoulder, elbow, wrist, or lower back mobility issues (or any other type of issue) that could result in pain or damage, either stop doing hanging knee raises or find a variation that you can safely do. If you don’t have commercially available straps and a safe place to fasten them, please find training or information for another variation.

Be sure to look for my upcoming Mountaineering Fitness: Beginner Training ManualDETAILS

Food, Water, Emergency Gear for Hiking

I just put up a YouTube video based on my recent book:

Mountaineering Fitness: Beginner Training Manual

If you want more information on how to get the book or subscribe to the monthly training program [CLICK HERE] and let’s get training together for the mountain of your dreams.

This video shows some of my recommendations about 

  • Snacks
  • Water bottles
  • Purificup Water Purification [CLICK HERE]
  • Goal Zero Battery Pack [CLICK HERE]
  • First Aid
  • Headlamp
  • And More…

Check out the video and leave comments if you agree or disagree with any of my own recommendations and preferences. Thanks!

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AgxXbKQtgIU

  • Training Program Subscription Offer ends June 27 2014.
  • Training Manual publishing August 2014

Shoes, Boots and Socks for Hiking and Mountaineering

I’d like to share my own recommendations for footwear for hiking, mountaineering and training from my current training program:

Mountaineering Fitness: Beginner Training Manual

If you’d like more info, please check out the page HERE to subscribe to the blog or the program.

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VFim2gFp-N4

If you’d like to subscribe now, you can do it below or from the CharlesMiske.com page linked above. It’s $30 for 16 weeks of training and includes the eBook text of the training manual, as well as 16 full weeks of training to get you to the top of your mountain this Summer. The form below will reveal the Buy Now button, so submit it and don’t reload the page. Thanks.

Sorry, offer expired for 2014